Posts Tagged ‘Education & Outreach’

Uncovering Winter’s Mysteries

Tuesday, November 26th, 2013

20131126_114712_resizedThis fall the trees here at the Reserve were absolutely gorgeous with the deep reds, vibrant yellows, and fiery organges displayed in their leaves.  As each leaf drops and fall turns to winter we are not as captivated by the trees but they still remain a significant feature in our landscape.  Have you ever wondered how the trees maintain their identity after losing their leaves?  Too often, we pass by and cannot identify one tree from another and just group them as “trees.” 

Recently, the Reserve had the wonderful opportunity to partner with Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge to help folks appreciate the numerous tree species we have in Delaware by offering a winter tree identification program.  Staff from both the Reserve and the Refuge demonstrated how to use identification skills and field guides to uncover the mystery of each tree’s identity.  It provided the program participants an opportunity to explore areas of the Refuge and the Blackbird Creek Reserve to put their new found skills to the test.  It is truly amazing to look closely at the beauty of the trees through their bark, twigs, buds, and leaf scars.  Oh what a story they could tell if only they could speak.  We hope you have an opportunity to go exploring this winter and look a little closer at your surroundings. You may be surprised by what you see.

Movie stars at the St. Jones Reserve

Friday, November 9th, 2012

Did you see the movie stars at the St. Jones Reserve this past Saturday?  They attended the premiere of the new St. Jones River video entitled The Price of Progress…The Promise of Protection in which they starred.  The 20-minute video explored the St. Jones River through time. The river is both rich in natural history and cultural history.  If you missed the show you still have an opportunity to see it as we will be showing it again this winter.  Copies will also be available for educational use.

In addition to the premiere of the new video during the St. Jones Open House, we also showcased the research being conducted at the Reserve as well as the sea level rise inundation mapping tool; the facility and estuarium were opened for tours; and there were crafts for our younger visitors.  The Open House was held in conjunction with the Delaware Native Plant Society’s annual plant sale.  Thank you to all who visited us at the Open House and Plant Sale!

Learning from the River

Tuesday, July 31st, 2012

How better to learn about a watershed than to experience it? On July 12, 2012 teachers from several states participated in a watershed tour of the St. Jones River coordinated by the Reserve in collaboration with the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary (the Partnership).  The tour is one component of the Partnership’s annual watershed workshop for teachers.   The teachers explored the history, habitats, impacts, and the restoration efforts occurring in and along the St. Jones River in Kent County, Delaware.  At each stop along the tour teachers had the opportunity to interact with scientists, resource managers, and environmental educators about the importance of the St. Jones River; how it was impacted in the past; what impacts it today; and how it is being protected for tomorrow.   If you want to learn more about the St. Jones River visit the St. Jones Reserve south of the Dover Air Force Base in Dover, DE.

The Land Where Our Forefather Roamed

Monday, July 2nd, 2012

If you have ever visited the St. Jones Reserve you may know that we are neighbors of the John Dickinson Plantation.  At one time the St. Jones Reserve property was owned by the Dickinson family during the 18th century.   Mr. Dickinson was called the “Penman of the Revolution” because he was known for his Letters of a Pennsylvania Farmer to the Inhabitants of the British Colonies.  John was a politician but he identified himself as a farmer.   His cattle once grazed on salt meadow hay in the upper marsh surrounding the St. Jones River. He also saw the need to be a conservationist.  As he watched the trees in the area being depleted, he instituted a policy on his land where only dead tree material was to be utilized for building and repair. 

If you are looking for something to do this 4th of July week , visit the John Dickinson Plantation and the St. Jones Reserve to see the land where our forefather once roamed.  For more information about John Dickinson and the Plantation visit the John Dickinson Plantation on the web.  Please note that the Reserve and Plantation are closed on the 4th but opened other days of the week.

Destination: Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico

Monday, January 30th, 2012

It’s been a fairly mild winter; however, I do find myself daydreaming of warmer places.  The National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS) has 28 Reserves around the United States and its territories of which the Delaware NERR is apart.    One of the Reserves I have wanted to visit is Jobos Bay in Aguirre, Puerto Rico.  This Reserve was adopted into the national system in 1981.   With approximately 3,300 acres, Jobos Bay NERR encompasses a wide variety of habitats including mangrove forests, subtropical dry forests, sea grass beds, salt flats, and coral reefs.  It is home to animals such as the peregrine falcon, West Indian manatee, brown pelicans, and hawksbill turtles.  Jobos Bay would make a great destination!  For more information about Jobos Bay NERR visit them on Facebook and on the National Estuarine Research Reserve website.  Keep checking back for the next Reserve Destination location.

Calling all teachers looking for a great field trip

Thursday, January 12th, 2012

The St. Jones Reserve is now taking reservations for the Spring 2012 and Fall 2012 field trip seasons.  We thank everyone for their patience and support as the Reserve was in a strategic planning mode this past fall.  We will be offering field trip opportunities on Tuesdays and Wednesdays beginning March 1st.   Field trips are designed based on grade levels and Delaware state standards. Possible activities for your school’s field trip experience may include a muckless marsh walk; discovery labs on various topics (such as weather & climate, horseshoe crabs, water quality); activities about horseshoe crabs; skins, scat, and tracks activity; watershed models; fish printing; plant collecting and preservation; and boat trips just to name a few.   Please contact Kate Marvel if you are interested in participating in a field trip at the St. Jones Reserve by e-mailing her at Kate.Marvel@state.de.us or by calling (302) 739-3436.  For more information about the Reserve visit our website.

Fun Family Festival

Wednesday, October 19th, 2011

Looking for something fun to do this Saturday, October 22?  Join us at the 4th annual Blackbird Creek Fall Festival at the Blackbird Creek Reserve on 801 Blackbird Landing Road, Townsend, Delaware from 10 am – 4 pm.  Delight in the beauty of the Blackbird Creek by taking a hay ride or enjoying a leisurely canoe trip. Listen to the sounds of great musicians such as Em McKeever, Crabmeat Thompson, The Bog Turtle Band, Mallory Square, and Nice Like Dat.  The kids will enjoy exploring the straw maze, making fall crafts, watching the Retriever Demonstration by the Del Bay Retriever Club, and learning about Native American culture and heritage.  There will also be local artisans, vendors, exhibitors, demonstrations, and food.

And, if you are a runner/walker and are looking for a challenge, the Appoquinimink River Association is hosting the Run for our Rivers 5K at 9 am at the Blackbird Creek Reserve prior to the festival.  For more information about the 5K visit the Run for our Rivers webpage and for more information about the Blackbird Creek Fall Festival visit the Festival webpage.

Discovery Lab: Water Quality

Monday, August 8th, 2011

Looking for something fun to do this week?   Join a scientist on Thursday, August 11 from 9am – 11 am in the St. Jones Reserve Laboratory (818 Kitts Hummock Road in Dover, Delaware) to learn more about water quality in our waterways.  Be ready to investigate the quality of water by using test kits.  This is a great and fun way to how chemistry relates to biology! The program is designed for ages 13 and older.  Call the Reserve at (302)739-3436 to register.  This free actvity is offered as part of the Reserve’s public programming.  For more information about other programs the Reserve offers visit our Calendar of Events page.

Educating on a Changing Climate

Tuesday, July 19th, 2011

This past week teachers from Delaware and Pennsylvania dawned on a salty adventure exploring the current and potential effects of climate change on the Delaware Estuary.  This 2-day exploration was part of the annual 5- day Delaware Estuary Watershed Teacher Workshop conducted by the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary (PDE).  This year the Reserve partnered with PDE to provide information, activities, and tools for teachers to educate their students on climate change and sea level rise.  The teachers took part in a boat trip exploring the St. Jones River sub-estuary and heard from experts in the field of education, stewardship, and coastal issues including sea level rise and climate change.  To learn more about sea level rise and climate change visit  Delaware’s Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control and DNREC’s  Delaware Coastal Programs Office . For more information about the teacher workshop and more information about the Delaware Estuary visit the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary and the Thank You Delaware Bay campaign. 

Reserve staff bands Osprey near Jug Bay

Wednesday, July 6th, 2011

Last week the Delaware NERR staff had the great opportunity to band osprey with staff from our sister reserve, Chesapeake Bay Maryland NERR.  We began the day learning about their stewardship, education, and research projects followed by an awesome tour of their Jug Bay site.   In the afternoon we assisted Greg Kearns with the Patuxent River Park and the Maryland Reserve staff in banding osprey.  Osprey are large raptors that typically live around bodies of water which makes it easy to catch their favorite food…fish.  They often make their large nests of twigs, bark, and grass on the top of man-made structures such as poles and platforms.  Enjoy the photos of the osprey banding!  For more information about the Chesapeake Bay Maryland NERR or about the Patuxent River Park (including the Live Osprey Cam) visit them on the web.